Sparkling Reds, Rosé

 
Synonyms: Sparkling Reds, Rosé

Wine Name: Rosé Champagne, Sparkling Rosé, Blush Sparkling, Blush Prosecco, Cava Rosé, Sparkling Rosé Moscato, Brachetto d’ Acqui, Lambrusco, Sparkling Rosé Shiraz/Syrah, Sparkling Rosé Malbec

Background: Sparkling red and rosé wines as a group have quite a range of styles. They range from very dry rosé Champagnes such as a Billecart Salmon Brut Rosé, to light red wines with residual sweetness such as a Brachetto d’ Acqui or Lambrusco, to a full-bodied sparkling red wine such as a sparkling Shiraz. Blush wines of sparkling Moscato, Rieslings and almost any other popular grape are made from dry to off dry and sweet versions.

Basically the addition of red wine to add color and flavor or the fermentation of red grapes leaving the skins in the must add tannins to the taste of the sparkling wine. These tannins add a little astringency to the wine which acts as a palate cleanser while at the same time will allow the wine to pair better with fat in red meats (beef, lamb, game) and salty foods. When the wine is finished with residual sugar either to off dry, semi-sweet or sweet levels, better pairings with spicy hot foods and sweet foods are possible.

Classic Brands and Sources: Numerous brands and from most winemaking countries.

Characteristics:

Style #1 –

Body –

Acidity –

Sweetness –

Tannins –

Style #2 –

Body –

Acidity –

Sweetness –

Tannins –


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Sparkling reds and rosés go with foods just as their non-sparkling counterparts do based mostly on the acidity of the wine and food and the weight of the wine and food. If the sparkling wine is made in the traditional Champagne method and spends any degree of time on the yeast lees, the toastiness, bread and yeast flavors contribute a savoriness to the wine that allows it to pair better with less acidic and more savory dishes.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Dry rosé – Pairs with lamb, beef, veal, pork and salmon dishes with acidic sauces.
Off dry rosé or light red – Pairs with Pacific rim, Mexican and South American cuisine and any lightly spiced dishes.
Semi-sweet red – Matches well with savory dishes either cream, butter or cheese-based as well as tomato dishes or spicy cuisine.
Full-bodied sparkling red – Pairs well with medium to full-bodied savory to medium acid dishes

Cheese Pairings:
Dry rosé – Brie with rind, Brin D’Amour, Camembert with rind, Emmental, Feta, Garroxta, most goat cheeses, Muenster, Raclette, Reblochon, Saint-Nectaire, Swiss, Vacherin
Off dry rosé or light red – Brick, Colby, Double Glouster, Edam, Fontina, Gorgonzola, Gouda, Gruyère, Havarti, Langres, Vermont Shepard
Semi-sweet red – any rich cheese, blue cheeses, “cheese cake”
Full-bodied sparkling red – Mild Cheddar, Edam, Glouchester, Manchego, Muenster, Provolone (aged), Parmesan, Pecorino, Roncal, Smoked Gouda