Moschofilero

  (MOHS-koh-FEE-leh-roh)
Synonyms: Filleri Tripoleos, Moschophilero, Moscophilero, Mosxofilero, Phileri Tripoleos

Wine Name: Moschofilero

Background: Moschofilero is an aromatic white grape of Greek origins with a pink/purple skin and quite spicy flavor with good acidity. It has white flower aromas, honeysuckle, violets, and rose petals. It is not given malolactic treatment. It is grown throughout much of Greece, but primarily in Peloponnese where it is traditionally used to make a dry and bold wine with much spice and perfume. It is characterized by a “rose garden’ bouquet and is usually paired with fresh fruit or fruit-based desserts. It makes still, sparkling, and dessert wines, and can have characteristics similar to Muscat/Moscato wines.

Classic Brands and Sources: Boutari, Skouras

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical Greek, dry styleBody – light

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

 

Wine and food pairing guidelines:
pairs well with medium acidic foods (eg. yogurt) and fresh herbs,

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
seafood and shellfish with acidic sauces, grilled calamari, Taziki, yogurt and sour cream dips, hummus, kebabs, chicken souvlaki (grilled chicken on skewers) and Greek salad.

Cheese Pairings:
Feta, goat’s cheese (fresh), Manouri, a sheep’s milk “cream cheese”, Masseri, Myzithra, Ricotta (sheep’s milk), Gran Kinara and other acidic cheeses

Gavi di Gavi

(GAHV-ee)
Synonyms: Bianca Fernanda, Corteis, Cortese Bianca, Cortese Bianco, Cortese d’Asti, Cortese dell’Astigliano, Courteis, Cortesi, Courteisa, Fernanda Bianca, and Raverusto

Wine Name: Gavi, Gavi di Gavi, Colli Tortonese, Cortese, Cortese del Alto Monferatto, Bianco di Custoza

Background: Cortese is an acidic white grape from the Piedmont area of Italy, especially in the provinces of Alessandria and Asti. It is also grown in the more eastern areas of Lombardy and Verona. Cortese makes a light, citrusy white wine that goes well with seafood. Occasionally there are herbal notes and a distinct, elegant aftertaste. A frizzante version similar to Portugal’s Vinho Verde is also produced.

Classic Brands and Sources: Italy – Battistina, Bergaglio, Gian Piero Broglia, La Chiara, Chiarlo, La Guistiniana, F Martinetti, San Pietro, La Scolca, Castello di Tassarola, Villa Sparina

Characteristics:

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Northern Italian style, dry

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

Style #2 – Frizzante

Body – light

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Generally a light bodied white wine that goes well with acidic dishes

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Any seafood, shellfish especially with citrus sauces

Cheese Pairings:
Boursin herbed , Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream , Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow’s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois


Vermentino

  (ver-men-TEE-no)
Synonyms: Favorita, Pigato, Rolle, Formentino, Malvoisie de Corse

Wine Name: Vermentino, Vermentino di Gallura, Vermentino di Gallura Superiore

Background: This is a white grape used to make dry white wines and occasionally sweet or sparkling styles. It makes a refreshing, racy, citrus, green apple and often minerally dry wine. It is usually unoaked and moderate in alcohol. This is a classic Mediterranean grape variety, retaining its acidity well even in relatively warm regions.

Vermentino is widely planted in Sardinia and Corsica. In the Ligurian region of Italy it is known as Pigato, while in Piedmont Italy under the name Favorita. In Languedoc-Roussillon in southern France it is known as Rolle.

Classic Brands and Sources: Aia Vecchia, Cantine Argiolas, Sella and Mosca, Pieve de’Pitti, Laurent Miquel, Tablas Creek, Villa Appalaccia, Raffaldini Vineyards

Characteristics:

Style – typical

Body – light to medium (-)

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – slight to low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
pairs well with more acidic fish and white meat dishes, and vegetables

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
fish and shellfish with lemon sauces, pasta with fish, chicken or pork in tomato based sauces, bruschetta,

Cheese Pairings:
goat cheese, feta, Pecorino, Fontina

Refosco

  (REE-fo-sko)
Synonyms: Cagnina, Dolcedo Blau, Drobni Rifoshk, Grosse Syrah, Mercouri, Merkouri, Refasco, Refosca, Refoschino, Refosco del Pedunculo Rosso, Refosk, Refosko, Refousco, Rephousko, Rifosco, Rifoshk Debeli, Riphosko, Schittierer

Wine Name: Refosco

Background: Refosco is a dark-skinned grape of northeastern Italy, Slovenia and Croatia that produces a rich, tannic dark purple wine with black currant and plum flavors. It is moderately acidic and sometimes has a slight bitter finish. There are different varietals of Refosco grown so it is more a family of wines rather than always from one distinct grape.

The famous Giacomo Casanova liked Refosco wine and included mention of it in his memoirs.

Classic Brands and Sources: La Castelada, Dorigo, Marco Feluga, Gravner, Jermann, Livon, Rhonchi di Cialla, Rhonchi di Manzano, Franco Terpin, Villa Russiz, Villanova, Volpe Pasini (Italy); Bonny Doon, Montevina (USA)

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical

Body – medium (+)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – high


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs with full-bodied dishes such as red meats that have acidic sauces or marinades and ample salt.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Pairs with sausages, cold cuts, game, beef and grilled meats usually with an acidic sauce or marinade

Cheese Pairings:
Asiago (aged), blue cheese/gorgonzola, Castelmagno, Fontina, Gouda, Parmesan, Pecorino, sharp Cheddar

Vermentino

  (ver-men-TEA-no)
Synonyms: Agostenga, Arratelau, Brustiano Di Corsica, Carbes, Carbesso, Favorita, Formentino, Fourmentin, Garbesso. Grosse Clarette, Malvasia A Bonifacio, Malvasia Grossa, Malvasie, Malvoisie, Piccabon, Piga, Pigato, Rolle, Rossese, Sibirkovski, Uva Sapaiola, Uva Vermentino, Valentin, Varlentin, Varresana Bianca, Vennentino, Verlantin, Vermentini, Vermentino Bianco, Vermentino Pigato, Vermentinu

Wine Name: Vermentino, Vermentino di Gallura, Vermentino Di Sardegna, Riviera Ligure di Ponente Vermentino, Colli di Luni Vermentino, Candia dei Colli Apuani, Bolgheri Vermentino

Background: Vermentino is an aromatic white Mediterranean grape best known for that grown on the island of Sardinia, but also on the coast of Italy (Liguria, Tuscany) and France (Languedoc-Roussillon, Provence and the island of Corsica). There are small pockets grown in California and Australia also. The grape is closely related by DNA studies to the Furmint grape of Hungary. The wine usually has aromas of peach and pear and crisp acidity, citrus, herbal and mineral flavors simiilar to Assyrtico of Greece. It is usually made unoaked and tends to be lower in alcohol. On Sardinia, the grape is also used for some sweet and some sparkling wines.

Classic Brands and Sources: Argiolas, Cantina Gallura, Contini, Cantina di Santadi, Piero Mancini, Sella & Mosca (Sardinia); Bruna, Antinori Guado al Tasso, Poggiotondo (Italy); Antoine Arena, Domaine Gioielli Blanc, Prelius di Volpaia (Corsica); Domaine Richeaume, Domaine de la Courtade, Chateau de Bellet, Paul Mas, Domaine Alain Chabanon, Domaine de la Courtade (France); Tablas Creek, Uvaggio (California)

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low to slight


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs well with acidic dishes and vegetables that have herbal components.

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Seafood, shellfish, pork and chicken with acidic sauces such as those based with lemon, yogurt and sour cream. Dips, olives

Cheese Pairings:
Feta, goat’s cheese (fresh), Parmigiano-Reggiano, other acidic cheeses

Orvieto

  (oar-vee ET-oh)
A wine made from Grechetto (gra-KETT-oh) grapes.

Synonyms: Grechetto, Greghetto, Grechetto di Todi, Grechetto Spoletino, Greco Bianco di Perugia

Wine Name: Orvieto

Background: Grechetto is a central Italian grape grown mainly in Umbria with a pleasant nuttiness and leafiness. It is usually blended with Trebbiano and occasionally other white grapes into Orvieto wine. It is also used as a blending grape in Torgiano and Cervaro white wines. A semi-sweet version called abboccato is also produced from botrytized grapes.

Classic Brands and Sources: Antinori, Avignonesi, Barberani, Falesco, Palazzone, Castello della Sala

Characteristics:

Style #1 – dry

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

Style #2 – semi-sweet

Body – medium

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – semi-sweet

Tannins – low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs with acidic and herbal dishes

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Antipasta, heavier fish, chicken, pork and veal with citric and other acidic sauces; asparagus with lemon, vegetables with acidic sauces, sushi, risotto. light tomato based pasta

Cheese Pairings:
Boursin herbed, Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream, Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow’s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois

Grechetto

  (gra-KETT-oh)/(oar-vee ET-oh)
Synonyms: Grechetto, Greghetto, Grechetto di Todi, Grechetto Spoletino, Greco Bianco di Perugia

Wine Name: Orvieto

Background: Grechetto is a central Italian grape grown mainly in Umbria with a pleasant nuttiness and leafiness. It is usually blended with Trebbiano and occasionally other white grapes into Orvieto wine. It is also used as a blending grape in Torgiano and Cervaro white wines. A semi-sweet version called abboccato is also produced from botrytized grapes.

Classic Brands and Sources: Antinori, Avignonesi, Barberani, Falesco, Palazzone, Castello della Sala

Characteristics:

Style #1 – dry

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

Style #2 – semi-sweet

Body – medium

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – semi-sweet

Tannins – low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Pairs with acidic and herbal dishes

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Antipasta, heavier fish, chicken, pork and veal with citric and other acidic sauces; asparagus with lemon, vegetables with acidic sauces, sushi, risotto. light tomato based pasta

Cheese Pairings:
Boursin herbed, Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream, Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow’s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois

Vouvray

  (voo-VRAY)

Vouvray is 100% Chenin Blanc from the Vouvray region of the Loire Valley in France
Synonyms: Chenin Blanc, Pineau, Pineau de la Loire, Steen (South Africa), Pino Blanco (Latin America)

Wine Name: Chenin Blanc , Vouvray (voo-VRAY), Cremant d’ Loire (sparkling)

Background: As a young wine, Chenin Blanc may taste of fruity green apples and lemon seeds and aromas are less prominent than Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc wines. It can sometimes have a vegetal, off dry taste but it is one of the highest acidity grapes so it is usually crisp and clean. Chenin Blanc wines can age well and produce a honeyed, pineapple and exotic fruit taste with medium acid. The Loire Valley region in central France is the classic home of Chenin Blanc, especially in its subregions of Samur, Savennieres (Sa-ven-YAIR), and Vouvray. These areas also excel at producing a semi-dry and a late harvested sweet Chenin Blanc dessert wine and a sparkling wine called Cremant d’ Loire. South Africa now produces a fair amount of Chenin Blanc wine but they tend to make it less acidic and with more tropical fruit flavors than the Loire Valley wines.

Classic Brands and Sources: There are many Loire Valley producers of both dry and off dry Chenin Blancs; USA – Chalone, Chappellet, Dry Creek; South Africa – Kanu, Mulderbosch; New Zealand – Milton

Characteristics:

Style #1 – cool climate (Vouvray)

Body – light to medium (-)

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry to off dry

Tannins – low

Style #2 – warm climate

Body – medium

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry, fruity

Tannins – low

Style #3 – demi-sec

Body – medium (+) to full

Acidity – perceived as low

Sweetness – sweet

Tannins – low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:

Cool climate and warm climate with acidic light to medium bodied dishes; Off dry with Pacific Rim cuisines, spicy food and desserts

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Cool and warm climate Chenin Blanc goes with fish, shellfish, chicken, pork and veal with citric and other acidic sauces; salads, sushi; Off dry goes with Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, foie gras, apples and apple-based desserts

Cheese Pairings:
Boursin herbed (cool climate), Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream (warm weather), Neufchatel , Saint-Felicien (French cow;s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois

Chablis

Chablis is 100% Chardonnay from the same named region of France and is one of the many styles of Chardonnay wine.
  (shar-dohn-AY)
Synonyms: Chardonnay, Morillon (Austria)

Wine Name: Chardonnay, Chablis, White Burgundy, Burgundy Villages names, Blanc de Blanc (for many sparkling wines)

Background: In a cool climate, the Chardonnay grape takes on apple and green plum aromas. It may have a steely, mineral taste, with a light to medium body and medium (+) to high acidity. The Chablis and Champagne districts of France would be examples of this. In aged bottles of older vintages, there might be a clover honey taste. Other white French Burgundies (all Chardonnay grape) might be the same except less minerally and flinty due to a different soil.

In warm or hot climates Chardonnay may produce melon, peach, banana, mango and fig aromas but which are not very pronounced. It will be a medium acid, medium to full bodied wine such as found in a California or South Australian Chardonnay. If the Chardonnay has undergone malolactic fermentation (an additional fermentation with bacteria rather than yeast) and been fermented in small oak barrels, it might have rich, creamy pear, fig, hazelnut and vanilla (from the oak) flavors, with a long, luxurious finish and not acidic tasting at all.

Chardonnay takes well to oak flavors obtained by fermenting and/or aging in oak barrels with various percentages of new, vanillin flavored wood. Oaked Chardonnay can be slight, light, medium or heavy in vanillin flavor depending upon the winemaking techniques used. Almost all of the time if oak is used, malolactic fermentation produces a softening, creaminess and the perception of low acidity.

Classic Brands and Sources: Many French White Burgundy producers; Australia – Cape Mentelle, Grosset. Leeuwin, Nepenthe, Plantagenet; USA – Chateau St Jean, Chateau Montelena, Aubert, Au Bon Climat, Hanzell, Kistler, Shafer, Marcassin, Chateau Ste Michelle, Kendall-Jackson, Newton, Beringer; New Zealand – Kumeu River, Babich, Cloudy Bay, Dry River, Vavasour, Villa Maria; Chile – Montes, Tabali, Viña Casablanca; Argentina – Lucca

Characteristics:

Style #1 – Chablis style

Body – light

Acidity – high

Sweetness – dry, minerally

Tannins – low

Style #2 – unoaked, warm climate

Body – light to medium (-)

Acidity – medium (+)

Sweetness – dry, fruity

Tannins – low

Style #3 – lightly oaked cool climate
(white Burgundy style)

Body – medium (-)

Acidity – medium

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low

Style #4- lightly oaked warm climate

Body – medium

Acidity – medium (-)

Sweetness – dry, fruity

Tannins – medium (-) to medium

Style #5 – moderately oaked, warm climate

Body – medium(+) to full

Acidity – low

Sweetness – dry, but creamy

Tannins – medium (-) to medium


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
Unoaked – Pairs with medium bodied acidic foods.
Oaked – Pairs well with medium-bodied dishes that are buttery, fatty, savory or roasted or smoky

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
Unoaked – Pairs with fish, shellfish, chicken, pork and veal with citric and other acidic sauces; salads, sushi
Oaked – Pairs with heavier fish, shellfish, chicken, pork and veal with buttery, creamy or other savory sauces; pastas with buttery, pesto or cheese sauces, truffles, smoked salmon

Cheese Pairings:
Unoaked – Boursin herbed (cool climate), Brick, Derby, Feta (sheep’s milk), goat cheese, Gouda, Havarti, Majorero (Spanish hard goat cheese) Mahon, Bucheron (French goat cheese), dry Jack cheese, Cream (warm weather), Neufchatel , Saint -Felicien (French cow;s milk cheese), Raclette, Pave Affinois
Oaked – Mild cheddar, Chaumes, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar),Gouda, Smoked Gouda, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Triple Creme, St André, St Nectaire Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (with or without rinds)

White Rioja

(ree-YOH-ha), white, same as Macabeo or Viura and sometimes Verdejo
(mack-ah-BAY-oh), (vi-YOUR-ah), (var-DAY-hoe)
Synonyms: Maccebéo, Macabeu, Maccabeu, Viura

Wine Name: Macabeo, Viura, Verdejo, White Rioja

Background: Usually a blend, white Rioja is often composed of low acid grapes Macebeo and Verdejo. These are widely grown in the Rioja region of Spain as well as the Cava producing areas south of Barcelona. They are not very aromatic, and are relatively neutral grapes often used for blending but also used on its own in many Spanish white wines. The wine is low acid and goes with many savory dishes.

Classic Brands and Sources: Artadi, Bodegas Bretón, Martínez Bujanda, Enomar, Marqués de Caceres, Marqués de Murrieta, La Rioja Alta

Characteristics:

Style #1 – typical Spanish style
varietal or blended

Body – light

Acidity – low to medium (-)

Sweetness – dry

Tannins – low


Wine and food pairing guidelines:
pairs well with less acidic, more savory dishes with herbs

Foods and Entrees that usually pair:
fish/shellfish baked or poached with a savory sauce, or fried, frittatas, seafood pasta, polenta, pesto, white pizzas, risotto, savory soups, vegetable dishes

Cheese Pairings:
American, Colby, Mild cheddar, Velveeta, Double Glouchester (similar to mild cheddar), Fontina, Gouda, Manchego, Monterey Jack, Mozzarella, Provolone, Triple Creme, St André, Zamarano (Spanish sheep’s milk cheese), Brie and Camembert (without rinds)